Flying Witch has demonstrated the power of magic in everyday life since its first page. But when it comes to showcasing the fantastical kind of spells, it knows how to present them with warmth and sweetness. In its eighth volume, not only do we see more of these charms, but also a surprisingly big growth on Makoto’s behalf.

The gang takes a trip to a land known as Shimokita, where different worlds tend to intertwine. There, Makoto meets with a mana researcher and his mechanical familiar, who show her what sort of element her strength is in. Meanwhile, Anzu befriends a samurai ghost, while Akane teaches Makoto and Chinatsu some special tricks of the trade. Kei also gains an interest in another form of magic: the movie kind!

With every volume of Flying Witch comes a slow, melancholy pace in its storytelling, and this volume is no exception. When arriving at Shimokita, the characters take their time to smell the roses and check out the scenery. It’s these moments that author Chihiro Ishizuka takes great pleasure in bringing their world to the readers. Every countryside and beachside image showcased is filled with tender care via the author’s pen skills. It may seem clichéd, but Ishizuka truly works a special kind of magic when drawing their characters and worlds.

For the plot aspects, it’s here where we see a lot of depth added to the characters. Surprisingly, we learn about just what kind of spells Makoto can work with, demonstrating that she’s no Average Joe in the slightest. Although she’s a very different witch from when we first met her years back, it’s still a big shock when the mana researcher reveals what she’s actually capable of.

This does lead towards Flying Witch’s strengths in the humor department, with Makoto learning how to manipulate shadows and Chinatsu trying her best not to stink the house up. Anzu’s interaction with the samurai spirit leads the ghost to realize that there are many types of ghosts roaming about, with him drawing his sword at almost every turn. The real comedy is saved for Kei’s movie project, which has Makoto donning zombie makeup and going up against a special kind of weapon.

Ishizuka’s manga continues to be a delight, with every frame in Flying Witch capturing various special kinds of magic. It knows when to be laughable, while at the same time delivering a wonderfully quiet serenity when things calm down. Makoto’s journey is the epitome of comfortable reading, with Flying Witch demonstrating why even the best stories don’t have to be the most exciting.

FINAL GRADE:

Promotional consideration provided by Tomo Tran of Vertical Comics

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