Boston-based musician Seth Glier has had quite the amount of success given to him in the indie music world. He has shared the stage with such musical icons as James Taylor and Mark Knopfler, and is currently embarking on a 250-date tour with friend Liz Longley. This past Tuesday Seth Glier released his latest album The Next Right Thing, an album that's destined to break him into the mainstream world.

The album starts off with its title track, a gospel-like blues melody that sounds right off of a 1930s prison chain-gang. Its lyrics of searching for hope and praying for a miracle speak volumes to our current generation, of people in dire need of a drastic change in life. The jungle beat-infused "Down With The Ship" has elements of a classic Paul Simon ditty. The line "But who's gonna believe in you?" fits well with the theme of the song, one of a failure that belongs with the blamable party, whether it's just one person or an entire nation. Glier wears his heroes on his sleeve in "What The Others Have Done," a song that could've fit in Billy Joel's world of The Nylon Curtain. You feel the sadness in the woman's tale, where she's looking for a sort of love that will not use and abuse her in the long run; while at the same time finding her true identity in a realm without easy answers.

"No Place To Land" seems semi-autobiographical, with Glier dealing with the thoughts of fortune without fame. He works hard for the people who "came to see the tricks that sell the show," and finding the person whose heart he broke long ago. "I Don't Need You" is an anti-love song, dealing with pushing away the things that give a quick joy, but lacked the sort of compassion needed in a true relationship. A cold shoulder comes up in the line "You used to glaze me like champagne/To me it tasted like cocaine," showing that while the love as addicting it wasn't fulfilling. "Soul, Skin & Bones" closes the album with literally the proper atmosphere: a crackling fire, the chirping of crickets in the background and a soft guitar. It's a nicely-done love song to the perfect person in Glier's life, and acts as something of a lullaby for a weary-headed traveller.

Only one song off of The Next Right Thing doesn't work as well as it does live, and that is "Walk Katie Home." The song, about an old fling of Glier's, while containing a beautiful melody, does have something of a stalker-ish tone in the lyrics (a flaw that Glier admitted at his Tupelo show). Nonetheless it has its romantic moments, especially with such words as "I'll kiss the hope around your eyes" and "Be your reliever before the fever starts to rise." Still without the full backstory about the song it doesn't convey the message Glier explained while performing it in concert.

The Next Right Thing is the proper step needed to fill Glier's musical portfolio for big-time success. Cross your fingers that it happens, but until then catch Glier at a small club near you during the new year. (Tour dates can be found here.)

**** (out of five)

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